Tyrol is “discovered” (1800-1820)

Tyrol is “discovered” (1800-1820)

Initially Tyrol is not an interesting travel destination. But then the Tyrolean uprisings led by Andreas Hofer against Napoleon arouse general admiration in Europe. English and German writers begin to extol it, and singing Tyroleans are found all over the world as pedlars.

Andreas Hofer
Andreas Hofer, horse dealer and owner of the "Sandwirt" Inn in the Passeier valley, commands the Tyrolean peasant uprising in 1809 against French and Bavarian troops. In 1810 he is captured, and on Napoleon's orders, executed by firing squad in Mantua. In England and Germany Napoleon is hated - and Andreas Hofer is a hero. Plays, poems and songs recall his fate. The places associated with the Tyrolean uprisings become "sights".

Yodel for the Queen
Itinerant Tyrolean pedlars contribute to their homeland's fame worldwide. Their trademark is the colourful local costume. They sing at fairs and markets, spreading the image of the unspoilt Tyroler. Some pedlars who sang originally in order to attact custom, switch over entirely to singing. They yodel for the Tsar in St. Petersburg, for the Queen in London, and travel further afield.